Dog Walking Throughout The Cold Seasons

It’s wet, the sidewalk is completely covered in fall leaves, and the temperature is frigid… It’s a great day to take a walk — if you’re a Siberian husky.

If, however, you’re a Chihuahua, a Yorkie or a human, you’d probably rather take a long nap and hibernate through the cold seasons. But neither rain nor snow should keep your dog from his/or her appointed rounds. Just like mail carriers, they have to go out no matter the weather. Dogs need physical and mental stimulation just like humans do. Yet, a recent survey of 1,000 dog owners found that one in five did not walk their dogs on a daily basis.

So how do you make the winter dog-walking experience as pleasant as possible for both you and your canine companion? We’ve listed a few tips below to keep you and your dog healthy throughout the cold season.

snoop and mercy1. Before anything else, make sure that you’re appropriately dressed. Layer up, layers are the trick of the trade, make sure that your face is covered, wear hats and gloves. Others recommend thermals, and earmuffs. And for icy conditions, consider slip-on shoe attachments that provide traction on ice, such as Yaktrax or Get-a-Grip spikes.

2. And what about the dogs —  Smaller dogs, like Chihuahua’s, Yorkie’s and the more delicate breeds should always have coats on. Big factors are the dog’s breed and length of hair. If you have a husky, they would stay out longer than we would, dogs with thick fur coats can keep your pet warm enough that they don’t need anything. If you do have a larger dog that requires a coat, like a Great Dane, and are on a slight budget, a small trick is taking an extra large adult hoodie and simply cutting the arms out.

3. Are you planning on taking your dog out of Vancouver, into the mountains, for the Winter? Wondering about how to care for your dog in the snow? There are certain dogs that are bred for cold weather, and they generally won’t need anything, but for dogs that were not designed to be in the cold, smaller dogs or even some of the sleeker bigger dogs, investing in some boots to keep their feet warm & prevented from chafing is a good idea. Another concern when you walk your dog is that people put that salt down and that can really eat away at their paws. Salt can be a big problem as it can damage a dog’s paws, leading to infection. And the problems are compounded if the dog licks its paws. However, not all dogs will enjoy wearing boots on their feet. In this case, the most important thing is to clean off the paws with a towel when you get home, ensuring that all of the salt is off their paws.

4. And last, but most definitely not least, Know the limits. Just like us, pets’ cold tolerance can vary from pet to pet based on their coat, body fat stores, activity level, and health. Recognize problems. If your dog is whining, shivering, seems anxious, slows down or stops moving, seems weak, or starts looking for warm places to burrow, get them back inside quickly because they are showing signs of hypothermia, and be prepared as cold weather also brings the risks of severe winter weather, including wet roads and power outages.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *