Flea Prevention for Dogs

Flea Prevention!
As the weather starts warming up, and if you haven’t already, you might want to start thinking about flea & tick prevention for your dog. Fleas need warm temperatures to survive, and although they are common all year round, they will thrive in the warmer months.

Although few dog owners are fortunate enough to avoid a run-in with fleas, controlling them has become much simpler, safer, and more effective in the last few years. New products that break the flea’s reproductive cycle make it possible to keep the little critters away without exposing your dog to toxic chemicals. There are also plenty of at-home prevention methods available, which I will discuss below.

Symptoms
If your dog is continuously itching and scratching, this will most likely be your first clue that he/or she has fleas. If you do notice this, the first thing you should do is take a closer look. Although you may actually see the little dark brown bugs, your more likely to see what look like little black and white specks. The black specks are flea feces (or better known as “flea dirt”) and the white specks are their eggs.

If you think you’ve spotted some but aren’t quite sure, run a flea comb over your dog’s back, groin area, haunches, and tail. These are the places fleas like to hide out in most.

Animal fur textureIt’s important to stay on top of your dogs flea symptoms and behaviour. As while most dogs experience nothing more than itching, there is the possibility that others can develop flea allergy dermatitis. Heavy infestations can be serious enough to cause anemia, and some fleas carry diseases, such as typhus and tapeworm infections, that can be transmitted to your dog.

Flea basics
To completely get rid of fleas, you have to disrupt their life cycle. Fleas thrive in moist, humid environments — that’s why they’re a much bigger problem in the summer than in winter.

An adult flea can actually live for four months on the body of a dog, but it’ll die in a couple of days without a host. The biggest problem you’ll find is their eggs. A female flea can produce as many as 2,000 eggs during her short lifespan. The eggs fall off and hatch all over the house — mainly found in the carpet, on the couch and under the covers. Eventually those newly hatched fleas will need to find a host of their own, and the whole cycle starts all over again. So it’s not enough to kill the adult fleas; you have to get rid of all the eggs too.

Flea medication
New products are less toxic than older remedies and have made it easier to protect your dog from fleas. Some of these options can be pricey, but the upside is that they work. Some of our favourites are;

  • Revolution; Just one application a month provides protection against heartworms, fleas and other parasites. Can be used to treat puppies as young as 6 weeks, and is available in sizes to treat dogs up to 130 lbs with one simple monthly dose.
  • Advantage; Applied topically once every 4 weeks. Should only be used as a short term solution. Advantage; Applied topically once every 4 weeks. Should only be used as a short term solution.
  • Ovicollar; contains Precor, a non-toxic product that kills flea eggs. When the collar is worn continuously a single Ovicollar will work for up to 12 months on cats, 10 months on dogs.

How to prevent fleas – At home
Although we do recommend beginning a medicated flea treatment for your dog, there are a few other things you can do at home to prevent the infestation of fleas.

Dog in a bath

Regular grooming & bathing of your dog is a good first step, which can also allow you to check your dogs skin and fur for any signs of fleas or irritation. This is best done with a natural shampoo formulated for dogs. An Oatmeal Shampoo is perfect for dogs with dry, itchy skin and allergies.

Ensure that you are washing your dog’s bedding in hot, soapy water once a week. If your dog spends time on a blanket on the sofa, or any type of bedding, wash that too.

And finally, be on the lookout when you vacuum your home. Get into the corners too, and pay special attention to the areas around where your dog spends the most of his/or her time. Be sure to empty the canister and dispose of its contents after each clean.

Leash Training with Dogs

Dog on Leash

Dogs are not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind on a leash. Here at Dharma Dog we understand that some people find teaching leash manners to be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring their surroundings, in and around Vancouver. Leashes also constrain their natural behaviours and movements, to want to run around or even to stop and sniff. The most critical thing to remember is to never allow your dog to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes, it pays off.

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. If you’re doing this at home, keep training sessions short for maximum concentration. And since these loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered walking.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are also great to use so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training.

If your dog gets wildly excited before you’ve even left for your walk, you need to focus on that before anything else. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as he/or she is calm, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body, holding constant pressure. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

Choosing the Right Walking Equipment

While you’re teaching your dog not to pull, you should be using a six-foot cotton leash. Retractable leashes, or leashes longer than six feet in length are great for trained dogs, but they don’t work if you’re trying to teach your dog not to pull on leash.

Cotton Leash

Having a retractable leash before your dog is leash trained can cause all sorts of panic. For example, in the above scenario, if your dog is being approached by an aggressive dog, it is nearly impossible to get control of the situation if the need arises. It’s much easier to regain control of – or protect — a dog at the end of a six-foot standard flat leash than it is if he’s 20 or so feet away at the end of what amounts to a thin string. The thin string of the these leashes can also easily break, or cause burns, cuts, or injuries to the dog if jerked too suddenly.

Dogs Who Resist Walking on Leash

Some dogs may actually be reluctant to walk on leash. Instead of pulling, they freeze or turn around and pull back toward home. Often these dogs are fearful, and they need help feeling comfortable when walking on leash.

When your dog freezes, you can try stopping a few feet in front of your dog and waiting. If he shows any signs of moving toward you, say “Yes!” and reach toward him to deliver a treat, showing good behaviour. Praise and reward him only for forward movement. It will also help to walk your dog in quieter areas at first. Instead of walking on a busy road, opt for a quiet residential street or a path through the park. Even sitting on a quiet beach might do the trick to allow your dog to get used to being on leash.

Brushing Your Dog and Other helpful hints.

grooming table

How to prepare your dog for the groomer?Here at Dharma Dog, we are constantly trying to teach our clients new things to help their dog be happy and comfortable when they are in their own home. Although this comes in many aspects, training and socialisation being two of those, knowing the at home care and preparation for your dog’s grooming is just as important. What many people don’t realise is that adding the simplest extra details to your dogs at home grooming, can make a life of difference to the job of your professional Groomer, and also your wallet!

The thing of it is, even if your dog has minimal hair and you do all of your dog’s grooming care yourself at home, you’re still going to want to teach him or her how to behave for the whole process, without traumatizing them. And although people may believe that this only applies to small dogs, or dogs with a lot of hair, larger & short haired dogs need just as much training than small dogs, especially while young, since it will be MUCH harder to control them once they learn to throw their weight around. It’s also important to remember to employ proper positive reinforcement techniques with larger dogs, since (especially if going to an actual Groomer) you can’t just “force” them through the process.

Rosie B&A

Below we’ve listed some tips on what you can do at home to make the transition into grooming a successful one.

General Atmosphere

Although Dharma Dog likes to keep a calm spa-like atmosphere, some grooming shops can be very noisy, busy, and filled with other dogs. Your dog will be crated when not actively being groomed, which means crate training is a necessity for dogs of all shapes and sizes. You do not want to put your dog through a traumatizing experiencing, crying at the top of its lungs trying to get out, or worse, eliminating in its kennel. This also makes the process take longer, if the dog needs to be rewashed, and therefore may end up costing you more money.

Socialization is a huge part of preparing your dog for future grooms. It’s common sense to be doing this regardless, but letting your dog experience lots of new places, people, and other dogs will help him or her enjoy the atmosphere of the Groomer as opposed to dreading it.

Bath Time

lucy before

Most likely, your dog will be put in a tub with running water out of a spray nozzle, not a filled tub. He or she will be soaked down, possibly have his or her anal glands expressed, if requested, and soaped up. Water and shampoo will be coming in contact with every inch of your dog, including his or her face, and he or she will need to be prepared to be manhandled all over.

You can help get your dog used to running water just by exposing him or her to it at a young age. Remember, though, work slow! If you go to fast and blast your dog in the face, you’re going to make them afraid and imprint them with fear. You can just set them in the tub and start the water running at bath time, or even just to practise. If you don’t want your dog getting wet, stand them where the water’s pooling a bit, and let them explore if they’re curious, and remember to praise and possibly treat for good behaviour. Remember though, if your dog gets wet, you will need to comb them as they dry, and after they’re dry, or they will mat up. Water + No Comb Out = Matted Dog!

This is also a good opportunity to try and teach your dog how to stand calmly. It’s difficult when default mode for a dog is a “sit”, because while the dog is technically being good, it’s impossible to wash and rinse a sitting dog. Work on something of a “Stand Up” command, and if your dog responds to this well ,make sure to tell your Groomer whatever word you use so that they can reinforce that behaviour. Teach your dog to stand still, then work up to standing there while you pick up and rub paws, lifting their tail, and rubbing their face – only praising them when they don’t pull away. This may take some time, and no Groomer is going to expect a puppy or new rescue to be perfect right away. However, standing still for everything is the ultimate goal.

Drying & Brushing

Whether hand drying on the grooming table, or blow-drying in the kennel, your dog will have warm, possibly loud, air blown on them during the grooming process. The easiest thing you can work on with your dog at home is by using your own hairdryer. However, please remember, whenever working with a human hairdryer and dogs, use the coolest setting. Even though dog dryers do heat up quite a bit, they don’t get nearly as hot as we use on our own hair. When working with your dog, first let them sniff the dryer and let them get used to it. Then, hold it back from them (so you don’t surprise them) and turn it on, with the air facing away. Work on letting them get used to the noise at first. Once they’re fine with that, work on slowly introducing them to the air flow.

Once your work with the dryer goes well, you can introduce a brush into the mix. Depending on your dog, your Groomer may use any number of brushes for drying, but the default would be a slicker brush, so a small, soft one is best for training. You don’t have to brush hard, just get the dog used to the feeling while having the air on them at the same time. You should already be working at home at brushing and combing your dog to keep him or her mat free. We see so many people come through and it’s simply too late to de-mat their dog, which means the Groomer has no choice but to shave out the area to save your dog the pain and stress. It is also important to remember that even if your Groomer can de-mat your dog, it does come at a hefty cost. If you start early combing your dog down to the skin, then he or she should be a pro in no time.

After your initial grooming, it’s never too soon to start brushing your dog. Don’t wait a month to start. Do it the next day. Brushing just 5 minutes a day can do wonders!

Kokonee before & after

Talking to Your Groomer

Afterall, there is only so much prep work you can do at home before bringing your dog for a haircut. No dog is perfect, and we understand this, so it’s important to discuss with your Groomer things you’ve been working on, commands you use, and most importantly, areas your dog is still having trouble.

Further to this, it is also very important to be as clear as day when discussing your dogs grooming needs with your Groomer. You don’t want anything lost in translation. If you’re trying a new Groomer, and if you have photos of how you want your dog to look, this can be very helpful. It’s also best that you fully understand the type of haircut that you would like for your dog and any implications that may occur. Overall, a good Groomer should be very knowledgeable and should be able to guide you through this process if you are not 100% sure.

Bringing up the Perfect Puppy

Gallery

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Did you or your family happen to get a new puppy for Christmas? Puppies can bring the greatest of joys! The affection, and sheer innocence can brighten everyone’s day and add a sense of anticipation to return home from a long hard … Continue reading

Kids and Dogs

When dealing with kids and dogs there are a few simple strategies to help your kids feel like they’re helping raise and train your pooch.

Here are a few rules to help you understand the relationship between your child and your dog.

Dogs observe everything. They may not look like it, but they are watching what every member of the household is doing. This helps them find a secure place within the family. I don’t believe in “Pack status” but I do believe in dogs finding their role. They are ultimately looking for a few key behaviours in your family, one of which is CONSISTENCY

baby petting dog while parent supervise

Izzy enjoying a nice scratch from little Miles while under our close super vision

. Kids are often lacking consistency, and dogs will notice this.

How to help your child or children demonstrate consistent behaviour by setting a few key routines.

1. Supervise all interactions between your child and your dog closely. No matter how much you love and trust your dog it is still an animal. Dogs can be unpredictable at times and so can children! Be there to stop any unwanted behaviour from either of them! Never EVER leave a young child unsupervised with a dog, it can be a recipe for disaster.

2. Always have your child enter rooms or doorways first. Because children are small and often will weigh less than the family dog, it’s important to teach the dog not to follow its excitement and bowl the child over while racing  up stairs, or through a threshold.

3. Your kids room is just that! His or her room! Teach the dog that they are not allowed in the child’s room unless you choose to invite them. That goes double for being on the bed. I would recommend against allowing the dog to sleep in the same room as well. Visits and cuddling  are great, but let’s teach the dog that your child is entitled to have their own space in your household.

4. Teach your child to walk your dog on leash, however, it is so important that you have a second leash attached that an adult it holding on to. Imagine if your dog saw a squirrel dart across his path. Is your child strong enough to handle that kind of force? I don’t know about you but my dog loves squirrels, and if your dog isn’t already trained to heal or walk on loose leash this scenario can end up with a crying child who has scraped up everything and a dog that may be on the loose.

5. Once you have mastered some basic commands with your dog, try having your children reinforce them. Teach your children to have your dog “sit” or “down” and have your child reward them with a treat, fetch, or a gentle pat on the head. Remember to supervise this even closely as well.

6. Give your kids responsibility. How does “poop patrol” sound? Not much fun! But it is a reality of owning a dog.  You can also give them basic responsibilities like ensuring that the dog always has a fresh water supply. When your child is older, you can also ask them to be in charge of feeding your dog. Have them ask your dog to “sit” and “wait” and as they prepare the food and place it on the ground teach the dog to be patient and avoid rushing the food. This is vital!

7. Teach your children how to pet their dog. Many younger children like to grab and don’t know to be gentle and kind while handling their pet. At the same time it is also beneficial to teach the dog to be patient with your child. We worked on this from a very young age with our son Miles. He is now 14 months and will gently stroke Vegas. Vegas will also communicate when he’s had enough by walking away. When Vegas walks away we are sure to teach Miles to leave him be.

8. Teach your child to leave the dog alone when eating. Many people like the idea of taking away a food dish while a dog is near it. When I am sitting down to a dinner I would be pretty annoyed if you pulled my plate away from me unannounced!

9. Try to have your child attend all veterinary, training, or grooming appointments if possible. Teach them just how much money, time and dedication a dog really takes. You will help mould your child into a compassionate and caring dog owner.

10. Have fun!!! Show them all of the perks and loyalty a dog brings to the family. Go on awesome walks as a family. Hit some trails, beaches, and general adventures! After a tough day at school there is nothing like having that guaranteed friend who will not leave your side.

 

PS Please be extremely cautious if your child enjoys hugging your dog. I have worked with too many families with children AND adults who have received stitches to face after giving their family dog a hug. This is a matter of miscommunication. Humans hug to show affection while dogs mount by putting their paws around another dog to demonstrate dominance. It can also increase anxiety because the dog is feeling trapped. A flight or fight response. Just be careful to read your dogs signals. If you’re not sure how to, please give me a call for some training 🙂

 

Hopefully you enjoyed this post, please share with friends and family who have children!

Nik

Vancouver’s Best Dog Trainers

Here is my list of Vancouver’s best dog trainers.

This list will be a little biased because I will most definitely include myself 😉

I’m comfortable writing a list like this because we all have a little something to offer. Although I am confident in my abilities to teach and help rehabilitate dogs, I only offer one on one services. This may not be the right fit for some of you. There are also circumstances where I will help you learn to understand your dog better, but you may desire a group setting where you can work on agility!

Here are a few of my favourite Vancouver based dog trainers in no particular order.

Shannon Malmberg  from Zen Dog

Shannon is pleasant to speak with and is extremely knowledgeable. She offers a large group class or private consults if necessary.

Donna Hall From Hot Diggity Dog

Donna is a clicker training wiz and a really nice person who truly cares about the dogs she works with. She’s also a pretty decent poker player 🙂 Unfortunately she’ll be moving to Victoria! : (

Shelagh Begg from Dizine Canine

If you have a “bully breed” she’s an excellent choice!

Dog Smart is an alternative that offers long term training for those of you that feel you’d like constant guidance. Class settings, clicker training and a cool store.

I may as well include Dharma Dog! Call 604-327-3649 or email us at: info@dharmadogservices.com

As a certified behaviour specialist  and member of CAPPDT and of the APDT  I offer a variety of methods but really focus on the natural communication of dogs and learning how to build a lasting bond with them. I believe in a hands off approach and really focus on teaching you to better understand your dog. Recently I made a video of a leash training session.

Dog trainer vancouver

Dog Trainer Nik Fabisiak and his trusty sidekick Vegas

Good luck on your search for a dog trainer, but remember, it’s all about finding someone that you’re comfortable with and willing to follow their direction.

P.S. If your dog trainer makes you fee small and dumb for asking questions I suggest you fire them! No room for ego in any industry, especially dog training! 😉

 

Have fun!

 

Nik

 

 

 

 

How to teach your dog the perfect “Sit”

How to teach the perfect sit.

It’s actually not too difficult. Does your dog lift his but off of the ground immediately after being told to sit? Or does he simply ignore your request?

Do you hunch over your dog repeating”sit” “sit” “sit!!” and still nothing?

dog training

This puppy is learning to sit

Let’s work on 3 things:

Your body language

Your patience

and the timing of your reward

When trying to train your dog anything, practice in a quiet and calm environment at first.  You may even want to consider leaving his leash on.

First of all, NO MORE LEANING OVER YOUR DOG! Stand up nice and tall with your feet in a comfy position. By keeping your height elevated and not moving your dog can see that you are in your most confident position. Believe me, they can recognize this.

What motivates your dog? Is it treats? Praise and affection? Toys? Fetch? Most people with have a pretty good idea of what makes their dog tick, and once you have established this we can move on.

Patience: Say the word “Sit”. Don’t ask them, don’t shout it, just say it like you truly mean it. Some people like to implement a hand gesture along with the command and this does help too!  After giving them their command, just wait. Stand Tall, Stand still and wait.  This is where the leash can help with a high energy dog initially as you can restrain his movements.

Believe me that your patience here will pay off! Once your dog does sit don’t reward!!! Not right away at least. To teach a very good sit it is imperative to have the dog stay in the position for a few seconds. Over time you can even push this to minutes! When your’e completely satisfied with the result call your dog out of the position and reward immediately with a treat, or praise, or toy etc.. I taught my dog using fetch as his number one motivator and avoided treats whenever possible.

So remember,

Stand tall and still

Give command

be patient

Let the dog learn that sit really means sit

and reward like crazy when you invite him out of the position!!!

 

Warm regards,

 

Nik

 

 

How To Train Your Dog

How to train your dog? Well, the answer is not going to be what you’d like to hear. Or maybe you’ve already come to expect it.

Training your dog is all relative. It depends on so many factors and it would take a while to even begin to explain. I’m here to be informative in an abbreviated form today. I am often asked a variety of dog training questions by nearly every dog owner when they first meet me. “How do I get my dog to stop barking at everything?” is a very common question. Sometimes I’m asked “How do I get my dog to come back when I call him?” My answer is often very similar and almost always greeted with frustration or dissapointment. Some people will understand and dive right in learning as much about their fuzzy friends communication as they can. My answer is this “Each dog is different. I’ll have to ask you few questions to establish your dogs temperament, and really get to the route of the problem.”

That’s right, I answer thir questions with more questions! Those that care to listen will succeed, those that want the easy answer are not as close to allevaiting their dogs behaviour problems as they hoped.

My goal as a behaviourist is simple; Help humans learn to communicate clearly with their dog. Not the other way around. If you spoke English your entire life and I tried to teach you a listen but spoke only in Spanish, how successful do you think our lesson would be? Maybe you would learn eventually, but chances are you’d have to learn to understand Spanish first and that would likely take some time. My approach with dogs is similar. As humans we speak countless languages and have variety of dialects. Yet, we expext dogs to be able to learn them all. While dogs are able to demonstrate an ability to form word associations. a great example is this border collie who has roughly the same ability to understand human language as your average 3 year old human. But, that’s just it, your average 3 year old has a limited vocabulary! So do dogs.

Dogs speak an entirely different language that is much easier for us humans to learn. It’s made up of mainly body language and tiny cues that when trained to see can make a ton of sense.

So, when you ask me “How do I train my dog?”

Expect me to train you!

 

Warm regards,

Dog trainer vancouver

Dog Trainer Nik Fabisiak and his trusty sidekick Vegas

 

Nik

Bark! Understand why your dog appears to bark unnecessarily

To understand why your dog barks unnecessarily is a tricky subject.

Barking is something dogs often do to sound the alarm of a potential threat (in his mind).  Unfortunately for you and your neighbours, these ‘threats’ can include squirrels, birds, people or dogs walking by, noises, the garbage man, etc. Dogs may also bark when excited to initiate play, however this isn’t the focus of this blog.

 

A dog that barks at everyday occurrences is not a good watchdog. A dog like this is similar to a car alarm that keeps going off for no reason. People will eventually take no notice, even when he barks for a legitimate reason. He will only annoy the entire neighbourhood.

A good watchdog is one that barks only when something out of the ordinary happens; when someone attempts to enter your property or when there is imminent danger like a house fire.  Dogs naturally protect their territory but you need to teach him what is not a threat to you, your family or the territory.

 

Dogs that bark a lot can be of various personality types.  The very confident dog will feel it is his duty to ward off everything and everybody from his turf.  He is insistent in his warnings and is vigilant in keeping things away.  The timid or fearful dog may be very worried about these scary threats, as he feels vulnerable. He will do everything in his power to keep them from approaching his domain so he or his pack isn’t hurt.  This can even escalates into growling and biting.

 

 

A dog may also be barking to call the pack back to him (separation anxiety) as he is worried for his safety and that of the pack.

 

These are all natural survival instincts for dogs.  Since they are dogs living in a human society, we need to teach them in their own language what warrants concern, what is acceptable barking, and what is not.

 

Things that you can put in place to help the situation include:

 

Don’t react to your dog every time he barks by calling him, going to him, or yelling at him.  You are only reinforcing his ‘calling of the pack’ responsibility.

Provide a safe place for him to sleep and relax when he is left alone.  Patrolling an entire house is a huge job that will require lots of barking.

Provide your dog with a sense of strong leadership from you.  He will feel less vulnerable if he knows you are capable of taking care of him and the pack.  This includes setting rules, getting him to work for you by following and focusing, and not acceding to requests from him for attention, games, coming in or going out, etc.

Understanding the temperament of your dog, the constant messages he’s sending to you and others, and the scope of his concern is paramount to educating him and controlling the barking.  Some solutions that are available to stop barking can possibly make the matter worse. So any gimmicky item (bark collars etc) can actually put a great deal of stress on your dog. Although it stops him from barking unnecessarily he definitely is still feeling the need to bark and will not actually understand that he shouldn’t be.

If you’re frustrated by your dogs barking and require help understanding your pet, I highly recommend that you seek proffessional help. Find a trainer that you’re comfortable with and follow through on their instructions.

Good luck!

 

Nik

dog barking out window

SOme dog’s think that it’s necessary to announce the presence of danger…

Driving Safety Tips

Sorry that it’s been such a long time betwen posts. As some of you already know I was recently in a car accident and bumped my head! I suffered a concussion and really haven’t been able to focus on any task for more than a few minutes. I’m feeling a little better but still do not feel quite myself. My neck doesnt feel quite right either so I have been less active around the shop as well. I should also let you all know that I suffered a head trauma about 6 years ago when I underwent a craniotomy.

The experience of my car accident really had me thinking about the safety of our dogs while they ride in our cars. Vegas happened to be with me that day and luckily he was alright.

I often see people driving with their dogs in the front seat, on their owners laps, even up near the rear window! The worst one I see is dogs riding in the back of pick up trucks without being properly strapped in or secured.

unsafe driving with dog

This is a demonstration of the WRONG way to transport your dog

When driving your dog here are some suggestions for the varios types of vehicles out there!

Car:  You can purchase a dog harness which will enable you to actually buckle your dog up. This way your beloved pooch won’t hurt himself or you in the even of an accident.

dog car safety

This is a great safety option for dogs while driving in the car.

SUV or Van: When driving in an S.U.V. or Van you can apply a few options.  You can purchase a harness system as demonstrated above. You can even crate the dog and strap the crate in. This way your dog won’t fly around in the event of an accident. Another good idea is to provide a seperation between the trunk area and the passenger seats.

dog car safety

A safe way to transort dogs in an suv or van

And finally, the pick up truck. Either put the dog in the front seat with a safety harness or if you must transport your dog in the bed of the pick up. Please put your dog in a rear facing crate which is properly tethered. Please see example below,

dog truck safety

A dog rides safely in the back of his owners truck.

Have a safe drive!

 

Nik