Mental Stimulation: Getting the best out of your dog

Did you know, boredom and excess energy are two common reasons for behaviour problems in dogs. This makes sense because they’ve been naturally bred to lead very active lives. Wild dogs spend about 80% of their waking hours hunting and scavenging for food. Domestic dogs have been helping and working alongside us for thousands of years, for tasks such as hunting, farming or protection. For example, retrievers and pointers were bred to locate and fetch game and water birds. Scent hounds, like coonhounds and beagles, were bred to find rabbits, foxes and other small prey. Dogs like German shepherds, collies, cattle dogs and sheepdogs were bred to herd livestock.

Whether dogs were working for us or scavenging on their own, their survival once depended on lots of exercise and problem solving. But what about now?Dog Resting on Floor

Today that’s changed. While we’re away at work all day, they generally have not much else to do but sleep. The result is dogs who are bored, often overweight and have too much energy. It’s a perfect recipe for behaviour problems.

How do we fix this problem?

It’s not necessary to quit your job, take up duck hunting or get yourself a bunch of sheep to keep your dog out of trouble. However, we encourage you to find ways to exercise not only their body, but their brain. And because we all lead busy lives, and can’t always hire a Dog Walker or Daycare Service, if you give your dog “jobs” to do when they’re by herself, they’ll be less likely to come up with her own ways to occupy her time, like chewing your couch, raiding the trash or eating your favourite pair of shoes.

Nik Training Dogs

We, at Dharma Dog Services, have been putting this idea to practise with our Social Club crew, with a new program called “Today We’re Working On…”. We know that all of our Social Club dogs already get an abundance of physical exercise they need, and socialisation, at our Daycare, but what about mental exercise? This where we have stepped in. The results? Some very happy, tired, well behaved dogs! And of course, happy owners!

Below you will see some of the exercises that we have been doing with our dogs. Some behavioural exercises, some fun games and tricks – both just as satisfying for you and your dog.

If you want any tips on games you can play with your dog, or leave for your dog to do whilst you are at work, let us know! Or if you have any of your own, I’d love to hear them. We’re always looking for creative ideas, and requests, that we can put into practise with our crew. Learn more about our Social Club here – or like us on Facebook for more videos & updates.

Today We’re Working On… Patience!

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…Listening!

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…Show Us Your Tricks!

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Click here to view Video (2)

Leash Training with Dogs

Dog on Leash

Dogs are not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind on a leash. Here at Dharma Dog we understand that some people find teaching leash manners to be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring their surroundings, in and around Vancouver. Leashes also constrain their natural behaviours and movements, to want to run around or even to stop and sniff. The most critical thing to remember is to never allow your dog to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes, it pays off.

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. If you’re doing this at home, keep training sessions short for maximum concentration. And since these loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered walking.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are also great to use so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training.

If your dog gets wildly excited before you’ve even left for your walk, you need to focus on that before anything else. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as he/or she is calm, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body, holding constant pressure. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

Choosing the Right Walking Equipment

While you’re teaching your dog not to pull, you should be using a six-foot cotton leash. Retractable leashes, or leashes longer than six feet in length are great for trained dogs, but they don’t work if you’re trying to teach your dog not to pull on leash.

Cotton Leash

Having a retractable leash before your dog is leash trained can cause all sorts of panic. For example, in the above scenario, if your dog is being approached by an aggressive dog, it is nearly impossible to get control of the situation if the need arises. It’s much easier to regain control of – or protect — a dog at the end of a six-foot standard flat leash than it is if he’s 20 or so feet away at the end of what amounts to a thin string. The thin string of the these leashes can also easily break, or cause burns, cuts, or injuries to the dog if jerked too suddenly.

Dogs Who Resist Walking on Leash

Some dogs may actually be reluctant to walk on leash. Instead of pulling, they freeze or turn around and pull back toward home. Often these dogs are fearful, and they need help feeling comfortable when walking on leash.

When your dog freezes, you can try stopping a few feet in front of your dog and waiting. If he shows any signs of moving toward you, say “Yes!” and reach toward him to deliver a treat, showing good behaviour. Praise and reward him only for forward movement. It will also help to walk your dog in quieter areas at first. Instead of walking on a busy road, opt for a quiet residential street or a path through the park. Even sitting on a quiet beach might do the trick to allow your dog to get used to being on leash.

Brushing Your Dog and Other helpful hints.

grooming table

How to prepare your dog for the groomer?Here at Dharma Dog, we are constantly trying to teach our clients new things to help their dog be happy and comfortable when they are in their own home. Although this comes in many aspects, training and socialisation being two of those, knowing the at home care and preparation for your dog’s grooming is just as important. What many people don’t realise is that adding the simplest extra details to your dogs at home grooming, can make a life of difference to the job of your professional Groomer, and also your wallet!

The thing of it is, even if your dog has minimal hair and you do all of your dog’s grooming care yourself at home, you’re still going to want to teach him or her how to behave for the whole process, without traumatizing them. And although people may believe that this only applies to small dogs, or dogs with a lot of hair, larger & short haired dogs need just as much training than small dogs, especially while young, since it will be MUCH harder to control them once they learn to throw their weight around. It’s also important to remember to employ proper positive reinforcement techniques with larger dogs, since (especially if going to an actual Groomer) you can’t just “force” them through the process.

Rosie B&A

Below we’ve listed some tips on what you can do at home to make the transition into grooming a successful one.

General Atmosphere

Although Dharma Dog likes to keep a calm spa-like atmosphere, some grooming shops can be very noisy, busy, and filled with other dogs. Your dog will be crated when not actively being groomed, which means crate training is a necessity for dogs of all shapes and sizes. You do not want to put your dog through a traumatizing experiencing, crying at the top of its lungs trying to get out, or worse, eliminating in its kennel. This also makes the process take longer, if the dog needs to be rewashed, and therefore may end up costing you more money.

Socialization is a huge part of preparing your dog for future grooms. It’s common sense to be doing this regardless, but letting your dog experience lots of new places, people, and other dogs will help him or her enjoy the atmosphere of the Groomer as opposed to dreading it.

Bath Time

lucy before

Most likely, your dog will be put in a tub with running water out of a spray nozzle, not a filled tub. He or she will be soaked down, possibly have his or her anal glands expressed, if requested, and soaped up. Water and shampoo will be coming in contact with every inch of your dog, including his or her face, and he or she will need to be prepared to be manhandled all over.

You can help get your dog used to running water just by exposing him or her to it at a young age. Remember, though, work slow! If you go to fast and blast your dog in the face, you’re going to make them afraid and imprint them with fear. You can just set them in the tub and start the water running at bath time, or even just to practise. If you don’t want your dog getting wet, stand them where the water’s pooling a bit, and let them explore if they’re curious, and remember to praise and possibly treat for good behaviour. Remember though, if your dog gets wet, you will need to comb them as they dry, and after they’re dry, or they will mat up. Water + No Comb Out = Matted Dog!

This is also a good opportunity to try and teach your dog how to stand calmly. It’s difficult when default mode for a dog is a “sit”, because while the dog is technically being good, it’s impossible to wash and rinse a sitting dog. Work on something of a “Stand Up” command, and if your dog responds to this well ,make sure to tell your Groomer whatever word you use so that they can reinforce that behaviour. Teach your dog to stand still, then work up to standing there while you pick up and rub paws, lifting their tail, and rubbing their face – only praising them when they don’t pull away. This may take some time, and no Groomer is going to expect a puppy or new rescue to be perfect right away. However, standing still for everything is the ultimate goal.

Drying & Brushing

Whether hand drying on the grooming table, or blow-drying in the kennel, your dog will have warm, possibly loud, air blown on them during the grooming process. The easiest thing you can work on with your dog at home is by using your own hairdryer. However, please remember, whenever working with a human hairdryer and dogs, use the coolest setting. Even though dog dryers do heat up quite a bit, they don’t get nearly as hot as we use on our own hair. When working with your dog, first let them sniff the dryer and let them get used to it. Then, hold it back from them (so you don’t surprise them) and turn it on, with the air facing away. Work on letting them get used to the noise at first. Once they’re fine with that, work on slowly introducing them to the air flow.

Once your work with the dryer goes well, you can introduce a brush into the mix. Depending on your dog, your Groomer may use any number of brushes for drying, but the default would be a slicker brush, so a small, soft one is best for training. You don’t have to brush hard, just get the dog used to the feeling while having the air on them at the same time. You should already be working at home at brushing and combing your dog to keep him or her mat free. We see so many people come through and it’s simply too late to de-mat their dog, which means the Groomer has no choice but to shave out the area to save your dog the pain and stress. It is also important to remember that even if your Groomer can de-mat your dog, it does come at a hefty cost. If you start early combing your dog down to the skin, then he or she should be a pro in no time.

After your initial grooming, it’s never too soon to start brushing your dog. Don’t wait a month to start. Do it the next day. Brushing just 5 minutes a day can do wonders!

Kokonee before & after

Talking to Your Groomer

Afterall, there is only so much prep work you can do at home before bringing your dog for a haircut. No dog is perfect, and we understand this, so it’s important to discuss with your Groomer things you’ve been working on, commands you use, and most importantly, areas your dog is still having trouble.

Further to this, it is also very important to be as clear as day when discussing your dogs grooming needs with your Groomer. You don’t want anything lost in translation. If you’re trying a new Groomer, and if you have photos of how you want your dog to look, this can be very helpful. It’s also best that you fully understand the type of haircut that you would like for your dog and any implications that may occur. Overall, a good Groomer should be very knowledgeable and should be able to guide you through this process if you are not 100% sure.

Happy HOWLoween Tricks and Treats 3

We’ve reached the spookiest time of the year, HOWLoween is upon us!

Halloween can be a festive and fun time for children and families. But for pets? It may be a different story. Here we have listed a top 10 of doggy tips, so you and your pets can have a stress free Halloween.

Dia de los Muertos 135

1. No tricks, no treats: That bowl of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for your pets. Chocolate, in all forms, can be very dangerous, and even deadly, for dogs. Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also cause problems. small amounts of xylitol can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar and subsequent loss of coordination and seizures.

2. Halloween plants are for display, not for your dog:  Decorative plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn can produce stomach upset in pets who nibble on them.

3. Keep Halloween decorations out of reach: Wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations should be kept out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet might suffer cuts or burns, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.

4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise caution if you choose to add a candle: Dogs can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious pups especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.

5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets: Please don’t put your dog in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it. For pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume may cause some unnecessary stress for your dog.

6. Your dog loves his/or her costume? No problem! Make sure the costume isn’t annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal’s movement, hearing, ability to breathe or bark. Also, be sure to try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au naturale or donning a festive bandana.

7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume: Ensure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he/or she could choke on.

8. Keep your dog away from the front door: Unless your dog is highly social & well trained, he/or she should be kept away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pet, and vice versa.

9. If your dog is the trick-or-treater: If your taking your dog out after dark with you, minimize the chance of an accident by adding reflective tape to your pets costume.

10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog has proper licensed identification. If for any reason your dog escapes and becomes lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can be a lifesaver, increaing the chances that he/or she will be returned to you.

By using this tips, Dharma Dog hopes that you have a stress free and exciting HOWLoween!

Happy HOWLoween Tricks and Treats Part 2

Halloween Yorkshire Terriers

HOWLween is fast approaching, and with your dogs enjoying the delicious treats from our previous blog post, it’s the best time to tell you about some tricks you can teach your furry friend.

Don’t forget that you can also use the dog treats for leash training and to reward any good behaviours you may be working on at home currently.

TRICKS

1. Army Crawl

This trick will come in handy for your pup to creep up on unsuspecting trick-or-treaters, have him master this playful trick:

  1. First, make sure to have a treat in your hand, and that your dog acknowledges this, but don’t let him/or her have it until the end. Command your dog to lie down.
  2. Whilst holding the treat in front of your dog, slowly drag it away from him/or her and say “crawl” as you move away.
  3. When your dog follows and crawls, even just for a few inches, ensure to praise your dog for his/or her efforts! However, if your dog jumps up or walks to you instead, don’t reward them and start over.
  4. Continue with the above steps, working on increasing the distance little by little until your dog can crawl over to you without a problem.

2. Kiss

What is cuter than a puppy kiss, so teach your dog how to do this, the polite way, to attract more trick-or-treaters to your house:

  1. Grab a treat and whilst holding it in front of your dogs face, say “Kiss!” and lean your cheek to his/or her nose.
  2. As soon as your dog touches your cheek with their her nose, give him/or her a treat and pull away. Ensure to be quick, so that your dog doesn’t have the chance to lick you before getting the reward.
  3. Make sure to practice this with your dog first before allowing any children to perform the trick.

3. Peek-a-Boo

Teach your pup to hide and pop out at the opportune moment, this trick will be a guaranteed surprise!

  1. Firstly, calmly sit your dog down in front of you.
  2. Stick a piece of tape on the end of his nose. Make sure beforehand that the tape can be easily removed.
  3. When your dog lifts his/or her paw to remove or touch the tape, say “peek-a-boo!” and reward them with a treat.
  4. Repeat these steps until your dog is able to make a connection of the words “peek-a-boo!”, to pawing his nose, to then receiving a treat.

4. High-Five

This is a cool trick for the kids! You’ll definitely get extra candy if your dog is able to high-five the whole neighborhood!

  1. Calmly sit your dog down in front of you and hold a treat in front of your dog’s nose.
  2. Say “high-five!” as you tap his/or her foot.
  3. Your dog should lift his foot to paw at the treat, but you want to quickly move the treat away and instead tap his paw with your palm. Now praise them and offer the treat.
  4. Repeat this until your dog will be able to automatically high-five you on his own, without the treat present.

5. Sing

Now this trick may not be for every breed, and will take some experimenting, but it will be a blast to see your dog take the term “HOWLoween” to the next level.

  1. The first thing you need to experiment on is figuring out what makes your dog howl or sing. This can be an can be an instrument, a siren, or maybe even your own singing voice. In this case, most dogs will howl in response to a high pitched noise.
  2. Play the sound that makes your dog sing, but before you do so, make sure to command him/or her to “sing” when it happens.
  3. When your dog responds with his own song, reward him with a treat.
  4. Keep practising until your dog gets the hang of it and responds to your command rather than waiting for the sound.

Now when you go trick-or-treating with your furry pal, you’ll be able to show him/or her off for more delicious treats in your candy bag!

“Bark” is the New “Tweet” Part 2

CONTINUED FROM YESTERDAY…

In yesterday’s blog, I began a discussion on today’s social media for dogs. I started with Woof.co, which is an app for dog owners to document their dog’s story and connect with other dog owners in the area, and Pack Dog, which is a photo sharing dog profile type site and reminds me of online dating! Which is, by the way, how my husband Nik, and I met.

The next one I stumbled upon was Dogster. This is a busy site with so much sensory overload, but once my brain begins sorting the information that’s being thrown my way, I realize it has some terrific, original articles, videos, and funny confessionals. Seems like I could waste a lot of my valuable time browsing all their creative content. Right away I noticed this article: 5 of the Most Common Grooming Mistakes. Seems obvious that most dog owners would know these things, but seriously, there’s so much to know about owning a dog, I figured we could all benefit from the refresher! So I had to share that one with you. This one also struck my fancy, Do You Tip Your Groomer, Dog Walker or Pet Sitter? The writer takes a poll on what readers say is the norm.

Although this page grabs my attention, it somewhat loses my focus as they are pulling me in too many directions at once. It’s not so much about the connection with other dog owners in your proximity but more about spending time with resources, like a dog encyclopaedia mixed with facebook; pretty much everything you might want to know about dogs. They have a magazine and a subscription to email alerts on the latest scoops. I can see Dogster turning my day into a big wasted internet browsing day. I’ll have to remember this one next time my toddler is napping and I’m feeling lazy. “I know there’s laundry to do, babe, but Dogster has a new quiz on how to tell if your cat is a jerk!” I know I know, we don’t have a cat… Prefer cats? Visit Catster…

I really feel like a “Dog Mom” in the dog section of YouPet.com. With a list of most popular dog names to the featured breed of the week, I’m reminded of when I was pregnant with our son Miles, searching the web for sites targeted for mom-to-be’s and baby centre news. These furry babies can be added onto your profile, with photos and zip or area codes to connect you with other dog owners. It’s a networking site with blogs, forums, games, health information, and is not limited to dogs! Oh no, they’ve got you covered for any and all pet mummies and daddies: cats, birds, reptiles, horses, fish and more! You can become a member here. Seems like a great place to exchange ideas and learn about new ways to be the best pet owner you can be.

Finally I want to leave you with some dogs who are extremely popular on social media:

Boo’s Facebook has 37 million followers and his typical status update is a picture of his fluffy face popping out of an adorable canvas bag with the tagline “just hanging around”. He’s the number one dog on the internet, and he’s a 5 year old pomeranian.

naked lounging #noshame

Boo’s Facebook page has a ton of cutesy photos of him just lying around being adorable.

The celebrity dog @Oprahthedog is rapper, 50 Cent’s bitch. She has about 12k followers on Twitter. What a foul mouthed lil fool! Example of post, “Dad is heading to Europe tonight, I am SO having a party while he is gone. Woof woof!”

I don’t know about you but it seems like the ever growing community of dog owners and dog lovers out there want to connect and share about their experiences with each other, just the same way other groups do! So I hope I helped you get a head start with social networking with your dog(s) to join the other 170 million pet owners in North America alone. BOLz! Bark out louds!

-Joanne

Kids and Dogs

When dealing with kids and dogs there are a few simple strategies to help your kids feel like they’re helping raise and train your pooch.

Here are a few rules to help you understand the relationship between your child and your dog.

Dogs observe everything. They may not look like it, but they are watching what every member of the household is doing. This helps them find a secure place within the family. I don’t believe in “Pack status” but I do believe in dogs finding their role. They are ultimately looking for a few key behaviours in your family, one of which is CONSISTENCY

baby petting dog while parent supervise

Izzy enjoying a nice scratch from little Miles while under our close super vision

. Kids are often lacking consistency, and dogs will notice this.

How to help your child or children demonstrate consistent behaviour by setting a few key routines.

1. Supervise all interactions between your child and your dog closely. No matter how much you love and trust your dog it is still an animal. Dogs can be unpredictable at times and so can children! Be there to stop any unwanted behaviour from either of them! Never EVER leave a young child unsupervised with a dog, it can be a recipe for disaster.

2. Always have your child enter rooms or doorways first. Because children are small and often will weigh less than the family dog, it’s important to teach the dog not to follow its excitement and bowl the child over while racing  up stairs, or through a threshold.

3. Your kids room is just that! His or her room! Teach the dog that they are not allowed in the child’s room unless you choose to invite them. That goes double for being on the bed. I would recommend against allowing the dog to sleep in the same room as well. Visits and cuddling  are great, but let’s teach the dog that your child is entitled to have their own space in your household.

4. Teach your child to walk your dog on leash, however, it is so important that you have a second leash attached that an adult it holding on to. Imagine if your dog saw a squirrel dart across his path. Is your child strong enough to handle that kind of force? I don’t know about you but my dog loves squirrels, and if your dog isn’t already trained to heal or walk on loose leash this scenario can end up with a crying child who has scraped up everything and a dog that may be on the loose.

5. Once you have mastered some basic commands with your dog, try having your children reinforce them. Teach your children to have your dog “sit” or “down” and have your child reward them with a treat, fetch, or a gentle pat on the head. Remember to supervise this even closely as well.

6. Give your kids responsibility. How does “poop patrol” sound? Not much fun! But it is a reality of owning a dog.  You can also give them basic responsibilities like ensuring that the dog always has a fresh water supply. When your child is older, you can also ask them to be in charge of feeding your dog. Have them ask your dog to “sit” and “wait” and as they prepare the food and place it on the ground teach the dog to be patient and avoid rushing the food. This is vital!

7. Teach your children how to pet their dog. Many younger children like to grab and don’t know to be gentle and kind while handling their pet. At the same time it is also beneficial to teach the dog to be patient with your child. We worked on this from a very young age with our son Miles. He is now 14 months and will gently stroke Vegas. Vegas will also communicate when he’s had enough by walking away. When Vegas walks away we are sure to teach Miles to leave him be.

8. Teach your child to leave the dog alone when eating. Many people like the idea of taking away a food dish while a dog is near it. When I am sitting down to a dinner I would be pretty annoyed if you pulled my plate away from me unannounced!

9. Try to have your child attend all veterinary, training, or grooming appointments if possible. Teach them just how much money, time and dedication a dog really takes. You will help mould your child into a compassionate and caring dog owner.

10. Have fun!!! Show them all of the perks and loyalty a dog brings to the family. Go on awesome walks as a family. Hit some trails, beaches, and general adventures! After a tough day at school there is nothing like having that guaranteed friend who will not leave your side.

 

PS Please be extremely cautious if your child enjoys hugging your dog. I have worked with too many families with children AND adults who have received stitches to face after giving their family dog a hug. This is a matter of miscommunication. Humans hug to show affection while dogs mount by putting their paws around another dog to demonstrate dominance. It can also increase anxiety because the dog is feeling trapped. A flight or fight response. Just be careful to read your dogs signals. If you’re not sure how to, please give me a call for some training 🙂

 

Hopefully you enjoyed this post, please share with friends and family who have children!

Nik

Vancouver’s Best Dog Trainers

Here is my list of Vancouver’s best dog trainers.

This list will be a little biased because I will most definitely include myself 😉

I’m comfortable writing a list like this because we all have a little something to offer. Although I am confident in my abilities to teach and help rehabilitate dogs, I only offer one on one services. This may not be the right fit for some of you. There are also circumstances where I will help you learn to understand your dog better, but you may desire a group setting where you can work on agility!

Here are a few of my favourite Vancouver based dog trainers in no particular order.

Shannon Malmberg  from Zen Dog

Shannon is pleasant to speak with and is extremely knowledgeable. She offers a large group class or private consults if necessary.

Donna Hall From Hot Diggity Dog

Donna is a clicker training wiz and a really nice person who truly cares about the dogs she works with. She’s also a pretty decent poker player 🙂 Unfortunately she’ll be moving to Victoria! : (

Shelagh Begg from Dizine Canine

If you have a “bully breed” she’s an excellent choice!

Dog Smart is an alternative that offers long term training for those of you that feel you’d like constant guidance. Class settings, clicker training and a cool store.

I may as well include Dharma Dog! Call 604-327-3649 or email us at: info@dharmadogservices.com

As a certified behaviour specialist  and member of CAPPDT and of the APDT  I offer a variety of methods but really focus on the natural communication of dogs and learning how to build a lasting bond with them. I believe in a hands off approach and really focus on teaching you to better understand your dog. Recently I made a video of a leash training session.

Dog trainer vancouver

Dog Trainer Nik Fabisiak and his trusty sidekick Vegas

Good luck on your search for a dog trainer, but remember, it’s all about finding someone that you’re comfortable with and willing to follow their direction.

P.S. If your dog trainer makes you fee small and dumb for asking questions I suggest you fire them! No room for ego in any industry, especially dog training! 😉

 

Have fun!

 

Nik

 

 

 

 

A Complaint is Music to my Ears

Many times I hear about service complaints at this place or that. I’ve read reviews on-line, through social media, or heard them through word of mouth.

As a business owner I LOVE hearing a complaint from my customers. Why? Because I learn from them!

As a young dude growing up I would often get into trouble. A lot of trouble. I pushed boundaries, broke rules, probably broke the law on occasion. But I learned from those mistakes. I make an effort to avoid repeating the mistakes as often as possible.

It was easy to learn from my mistakes growing up because I would face the consequences directly. They weren’t hidden from me. I would often see the end result of some of my boneheaded ideas.

As a business owner, it is slightly different. I know our shop makes mistakes, and when I catch those mistakes we adjust our protocols and fix them. We make adjustments accordingly and make a very strong effort to avoid repeating them. It helps us leave work knowing that we’ve given the day our very best effort.

When I find out about a customer being unhappy or dissatisfied with the service I make the same effort to listen to the reason and make adjustments to prevent the issue. If a customer is dissatisfied however, and doesn’t let us know, we wont adjust. The end result is not so good for my little Mom and Pop shop.

Dharma Dog Services

Dharma Dog Services loves happy customers!

We probably won’t see the customer again, and they will likely make an effort to prevent others from trying our shop out! 🙁

Here are some tips to ensure satisfaction no matter which business you go to:

1. Ask to speak to the manager. Don’t be afraid, or embarrassed, let them know you were dissatisfied with the service, or product. Chances are they will be empathetic, and understanding as most businesses strive to achieve a certain standard.

2. Choose your language carefully. I heard a saying before that will help you immensely! “You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.”  Although you may be extremely upset, try not to be mean. If you’re feeling too angry or overwhelmed try to cool down before addressing the issue with the Manager. They’re a conduit to a solution for you. Try to work with them as a team. Don’t be a pushover but definitely make an effort to communicating your problem or needs versus simply being upset.

3.Give them a chance to fix it. Most problems are fairly small, and if they are a complaint about quality, then it’s definitely in your best interest to let the shop know. Chances are you will be heard, and worked with.

4. If your complaint isn’t being respected, or heard, escalate! If you don’t feel that the owner has given your situation the ol’ college try perhaps it’s time to report the business. or, simply never attend again.

 

Well, here’s hoping that I hear your complaint 😉

 

Nik

 

 

Vancouver off leash dog parks

Here are a few awesome off-leash dog parks in Vancouver that you might want to check out!

Vancouver truly offers some of the most beautiful off leash dog parks around. They are abundant!

 

 

Now, before I give you the list you must promise me to be an attentive owner and always pick up after your dog! 😉 No cell phones unless your dog is on-leash!

 

There are many awesome parks in Vancouver, but I’ve chosen to list only the few that are near South Van for now. I will post a downtown Vancouver edition soon!

Please be advised that rules and boundaries do change and it’s best to respected any posted signs in the area.

Here is a complete map of ALL of the off-leash dog parks in Vancouver

Off-leash dog park Vancouver

This is one of Dharma Dog’s favourite places to go play!

 

 

Everett Crowley Park

 

Address: 8200 Kerr Street, Vancouver, on the inner trails

 

Rules:

Off-leash times are all day, all year round.

 

Fraser River Park

Address:

8705 Angus Drive, Vancouver, at West 75th Avenue

 

Rules:

The west side is off-leash all day, all year round. The east side is off-leash all day between October 1st to April 30th; and on-leash from May 1st to September 30th. The river bank area is on-leash only at all times.

 

Fraserview Golf Course Park

 

Address: 8101 Kerr Street; boundaries are from Rosemont Avenue on the north to Kerr Street on the east and from Vivian Drive on the west

 

Rules:

Off-leash times are from 5am to 10am and from 5pm to 10pm all year round.

 

 

 

George Park

 

Address: 500 East 63rd Avenue, west of St. George Street

 

Rules:

Dogs are not allowed within 15 metres of the playground. Off-leash times are from 6am to 10am and from 5pm to 10pm all year round.

 

 John Henry (Trout Lake) Park

 

Address: 3300 Victoria Drive; boundaries are from the north end of the lake, the ball field on the west, the football field on the east, and the lake to the south

Rules:

Dogs can access the water here. Off-leash times are from 5am to 10pm all year round.

 

 

 

Jones Park

 

Address: 5350 Commercial Street

 

Rules:

Dogs are not allowed within 15 metres of the playground. Off-leash times are from 5am to 10am and from 5pm to 10pm all year round.

 

 

 

Killarney Park

 

Address: 6205 Kerr Street; boundaries are from the west side of the park between East 46 th Avenue on the north and East 48th Avenue on the south, Raleigh Street to the west and the walkway along the east at the parking lot

 

Rules:

Off-leash times are Labour Day to June 14th from 5am to 10am and from 5pm to 10pm; and June 15th to Labour Day from 5am to 10pm.

 

 

 

Kingcrest Park

Address: 4150 Knight Street; boundaries are between East 27th Avenue on the south, East King Edward Avenue on the north, and Dumfries Street on the east

 

Rules:

Off-leash times are from 5am to 10am and from 5pm to 10pm all year round.

 

 

Dogs are not allowed on the playground side of the park. Off-leash times are from 6am to 10pm all year round.

 

 

 

Musqueam Park

 

Address: 4000 SW Marine Drive at Crown Street

 

Rules:

Off-leash times are from 6am to 10pm all year round.

 

 

Nat Bailey Stadium Park

Address: 4601 Ontario Street, one block north of East 33rd Avenue on the west side of Ontario Street

Rules:

Off-leash times are from 6am to 10pm all year round.

 

 

 Oak Meadow Park

 

Address: 899 West 37th Avenue at Oak Street

 

Rules:

Off-leash times are from 6am to 10pm all year round.

Queen Elizabeth Park

 

Address: 4600 Cambie Street, off East 37th Avenue and Columbia Street

Rules:

Off-leash times are from 6am to 10pm all year round.

 

 

 

Sunset Park

 

Address: 300 East 53rd Avenue at Prince Edward Street

 

Rules:

Off-leash times are from 6am to 10pm all year round.

 

Tecumseh Park

 

Address: 1751 East 45th Avenue

Rules:

Dogs are not allowed within 15 metres of the playground. Off-leash times are from 5am to 10am and from 5pm to 10pm all year round.

Check out this map of ALL of the off leash dog parks in Vancouver: