Brushing Your Dog and Other helpful hints.

grooming table

How to prepare your dog for the groomer?Here at Dharma Dog, we are constantly trying to teach our clients new things to help their dog be happy and comfortable when they are in their own home. Although this comes in many aspects, training and socialisation being two of those, knowing the at home care and preparation for your dog’s grooming is just as important. What many people don’t realise is that adding the simplest extra details to your dogs at home grooming, can make a life of difference to the job of your professional Groomer, and also your wallet!

The thing of it is, even if your dog has minimal hair and you do all of your dog’s grooming care yourself at home, you’re still going to want to teach him or her how to behave for the whole process, without traumatizing them. And although people may believe that this only applies to small dogs, or dogs with a lot of hair, larger & short haired dogs need just as much training than small dogs, especially while young, since it will be MUCH harder to control them once they learn to throw their weight around. It’s also important to remember to employ proper positive reinforcement techniques with larger dogs, since (especially if going to an actual Groomer) you can’t just “force” them through the process.

Rosie B&A

Below we’ve listed some tips on what you can do at home to make the transition into grooming a successful one.

General Atmosphere

Although Dharma Dog likes to keep a calm spa-like atmosphere, some grooming shops can be very noisy, busy, and filled with other dogs. Your dog will be crated when not actively being groomed, which means crate training is a necessity for dogs of all shapes and sizes. You do not want to put your dog through a traumatizing experiencing, crying at the top of its lungs trying to get out, or worse, eliminating in its kennel. This also makes the process take longer, if the dog needs to be rewashed, and therefore may end up costing you more money.

Socialization is a huge part of preparing your dog for future grooms. It’s common sense to be doing this regardless, but letting your dog experience lots of new places, people, and other dogs will help him or her enjoy the atmosphere of the Groomer as opposed to dreading it.

Bath Time

lucy before

Most likely, your dog will be put in a tub with running water out of a spray nozzle, not a filled tub. He or she will be soaked down, possibly have his or her anal glands expressed, if requested, and soaped up. Water and shampoo will be coming in contact with every inch of your dog, including his or her face, and he or she will need to be prepared to be manhandled all over.

You can help get your dog used to running water just by exposing him or her to it at a young age. Remember, though, work slow! If you go to fast and blast your dog in the face, you’re going to make them afraid and imprint them with fear. You can just set them in the tub and start the water running at bath time, or even just to practise. If you don’t want your dog getting wet, stand them where the water’s pooling a bit, and let them explore if they’re curious, and remember to praise and possibly treat for good behaviour. Remember though, if your dog gets wet, you will need to comb them as they dry, and after they’re dry, or they will mat up. Water + No Comb Out = Matted Dog!

This is also a good opportunity to try and teach your dog how to stand calmly. It’s difficult when default mode for a dog is a “sit”, because while the dog is technically being good, it’s impossible to wash and rinse a sitting dog. Work on something of a “Stand Up” command, and if your dog responds to this well ,make sure to tell your Groomer whatever word you use so that they can reinforce that behaviour. Teach your dog to stand still, then work up to standing there while you pick up and rub paws, lifting their tail, and rubbing their face – only praising them when they don’t pull away. This may take some time, and no Groomer is going to expect a puppy or new rescue to be perfect right away. However, standing still for everything is the ultimate goal.

Drying & Brushing

Whether hand drying on the grooming table, or blow-drying in the kennel, your dog will have warm, possibly loud, air blown on them during the grooming process. The easiest thing you can work on with your dog at home is by using your own hairdryer. However, please remember, whenever working with a human hairdryer and dogs, use the coolest setting. Even though dog dryers do heat up quite a bit, they don’t get nearly as hot as we use on our own hair. When working with your dog, first let them sniff the dryer and let them get used to it. Then, hold it back from them (so you don’t surprise them) and turn it on, with the air facing away. Work on letting them get used to the noise at first. Once they’re fine with that, work on slowly introducing them to the air flow.

Once your work with the dryer goes well, you can introduce a brush into the mix. Depending on your dog, your Groomer may use any number of brushes for drying, but the default would be a slicker brush, so a small, soft one is best for training. You don’t have to brush hard, just get the dog used to the feeling while having the air on them at the same time. You should already be working at home at brushing and combing your dog to keep him or her mat free. We see so many people come through and it’s simply too late to de-mat their dog, which means the Groomer has no choice but to shave out the area to save your dog the pain and stress. It is also important to remember that even if your Groomer can de-mat your dog, it does come at a hefty cost. If you start early combing your dog down to the skin, then he or she should be a pro in no time.

After your initial grooming, it’s never too soon to start brushing your dog. Don’t wait a month to start. Do it the next day. Brushing just 5 minutes a day can do wonders!

Kokonee before & after

Talking to Your Groomer

Afterall, there is only so much prep work you can do at home before bringing your dog for a haircut. No dog is perfect, and we understand this, so it’s important to discuss with your Groomer things you’ve been working on, commands you use, and most importantly, areas your dog is still having trouble.

Further to this, it is also very important to be as clear as day when discussing your dogs grooming needs with your Groomer. You don’t want anything lost in translation. If you’re trying a new Groomer, and if you have photos of how you want your dog to look, this can be very helpful. It’s also best that you fully understand the type of haircut that you would like for your dog and any implications that may occur. Overall, a good Groomer should be very knowledgeable and should be able to guide you through this process if you are not 100% sure.

Bringing up the Perfect Puppy

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Did you or your family happen to get a new puppy for Christmas? Puppies can bring the greatest of joys! The affection, and sheer innocence can brighten everyone’s day and add a sense of anticipation to return home from a long hard … Continue reading

Excuse me, please don’t let your dog pee on my lavender

“Hello” I said as I passed by an older gentlemen with an aging black lab with signs of grey around its muzzle. “Good day” He replied. I walked by the pair and headed into my shop. I didn’t think much of the exchange as it appeared to be quite normal. That is until I noticed that the older man and his dog were making their way towards our shop.Dog and man on walk “Oh yes! Another customer!” I thought to myself. Wait, what are they doing? The old man glanced suspiciously over his shoulder at me as I watched the pair through our front display window and I realized that he was letting his dog relieve itself on our flower boxes which contain lavender! He quickly started leaving the scene of the crime as I exited the store to ask him about his choice of location, but he vanished around the corner of our building like some sort of free-peeing super heroes

Dog in a mask

Super peeing dog

leaving before any bystanders could reveal their true identities after witnessing him save the day…. or in this case peeing on private property!

“Please don’t let your dog pee on our lavender!” I shouted at them as they disappeared out of my sight.

Now, originally I thought I would give him the benefit of the doubt and perhaps it was simply an accident. I cleaned the area thoroughly to prevent any odour from developing and I disinfected it as well. Sometimes it’s difficult to control your dog when it has to use the washroom, and it isn’t exactly going to ask you politely to use your facilities. So I let bygones be bygones and went on with running the groom shop.

I happen to be in the shop fairly early this morning when to my astonishment I saw the same pair of free-peeing bandits. I watched curiously to see what actions they would take today. Sure enough the old boys crossed the street and took a direct route to my lavender flowers!!! Why!? oh why? The man  looked around nervously  and after not noticing anyone watching decided to do the same thing. Twice in two days. This is no coincidence! I guess it’s time for me to confront the two old pee machines and see what it is that motivates their need to turn my store front into a fire hydrant of sorts for all dogs to send and receive their urine soaked messages.

Now, to the untrained eye this would seem to be an act of petty malice, however seeing as it’s the Holiday season I’ve decided to myself and any of you who happen to be reading that he is just doing his kind act for the holidays. You see, the lavender appears dried out so perhaps he is simply encouraging his trusty old dog to help our shop water the plants!

Happy Holidays,

Nik

*This is a true story and I will post a photo of the culprits if they try to do it once again and will write a follow-up to how that conversation goes.

 

 

 

 

Dharma Dog has me exhausted!

I’m exhausted! After spending the last 8 months launching and running Dharma Dog I’ve nearly hit a wall. I can’t wait to take some time off in December to refresh my batteries and enjoy some well deserved rest and relaxation.

We will be closed from the 21st of December to January 6th 2014! two whole weeks! Weeeee!

We will still be offering boarding services, but all of our other services will be shut down for vacation 🙂

To put it all in perspective

I have worked 1920 hours in 8 months.

The average person works a 40 hour work week and gets breaks! Meaning in 8 months the average person has worked: 1280 hours. Nearly one month less than me!

Joanne and I decided that we wanted to open a shop that dog owners could trust and rely on and until we are booming it is necessary for me to put in the long hours. Will it all pay off? Who knows, but we’re hopefull!

 

I guess this is really just my way of announcing our vacation Schedule for December.

 

-nik

dharma dog daycare

Yay work!

Hug Your Dog Groomer!

When is the last time that you have trimmed your dogs nails yourself? How about brushed their teeth? Brushed their coat? Given them a bath? A fur cut?

If you have ever done these things on your own chances are you may realize just how difficult and time consuming it can really be. Not to mention stressful. Perhaps you’re one of the lucky ones who have a dog that will just completely relax and allow you to do whatever you might need. For many clients this is only a dream!

Now, just to be clear, I am NOT a dog groomer. I have expertly trained staff with loads of

vancouver dog grooming

Kaori taking a break while working on Mila the golden doodle

experience to handle to all of our shops grooming needs. I am however a canine behaviour therapist and trainer with experience to boot!

I watch all of our grooms closely whenever I have the opportunity, and let me tell you  that it is not easy!!

Typically a client will bring their dog in and request a style, remember, the dog that you know and see on a daily basis may not act like you’d expect when you’re not around. I’ve seen growling, spinning, biting, barking, and even pooping while dogs are being groomed! We make every effort at our shop to keep the environment calm and clean and as stress – free as possible, but on occasion our groomers will have to undo some bad associations that dog’s may have had from previous groomers at other shops. The process at Dharma Dog Daycare & Grooming is usually a smooth one and on occasion so relaxing for the dog that they actually will fall asleep!

I guess I’m really writing this in appreciation of our grooming staff and all groomers who are calm, relaxed, and are able to cope in their high pressure industry.

The next time that you visit your local grooming shop (hopefully it’s ours 😉 ) Just remember that it isn’t an easy job and to say thank you to the hard working groomers out there!

 

How to Keep Your dog Cool During a Vancouver Heat Wave

It’s not often that we hit 20 or 30 degree weather in Vancouver but when we do, most of us set out to the beach, the dog parks, the playground, the trails, the slurpee stores, you name it! If that means more time spent outdoors for your dog, more car rides, or more outings in general, then it’s wise to know the smarts on sunshine. All tips begin and end with water, water, water!

TIP #1 Never ever leave your dog in the hot car, the risk is harm or death. If you see a dog in a car on a hot day who you believe may be in trouble, call your local SPCA. Dogs don’t sweat! The car provides no way for a dog to release heat. It takes under 10 minutes for a car (even in the shade with cracked windows) to reach dangerous temperatures for dogs. Leave pets at home where they will be more comfortable, rather than in your car.

TIP #2 Learn how to spot an overheated dog. Keep an eye on his or her behaviour and watch for the following symptoms of heat stroke: excessive panting, salivation, anxious expression, lack of coordination, red lips and red tongue (may turn bluish), vomiting, collapse, even coma or death.

TIP #3 Prevent or treat heatstroke! Keep your pup hydrated (no ice, just cool water or ice cream), then bring him or her into the shade, pour cold water on your dog (start from the bottom up, feet, pads, stomach), and fan your dog to keep the coat from evaporating.

TIP #4 Avoid exercising your dog during the day, rather, exercise him or her in the morning or at night. It’s ok to decrease the intensity of exercise in higher temperatures. Carry a bottle of water on walks or strap it to your dog’s vest or bag so he or she feels a sense of purpose. An even better form of exercise in the heat is swimming! Let your dog paddle around in the ocean, the lake, the river or the pool.

TIP #5 Groom your dog to remove excess hair and undercoat. Be careful! Direct sun exposure can lead to burns if hair is too short or skin is exposed. Consult your grooming professional for expert advise.

TIP #6 Create a cool environment in the house or backyard even without A/C. Lay down a cool towel for your dog to lay on, offer a safe place for digging, or set up a kiddie pool. Try filling up an old milk jug with water and freeze overnight. Then leave it in the yard or house where your dog can cozy up to it for relief.

Again, the most important thing is to keep your dog hydrated, so make sure he or she can access the water bowl, which should be kept topped up with fresh cool water often. Enjoy the sunshine safely when you know your dog is happy and healthy!

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